Interviews/Reviews

Milici x Douglas x greathouse

Lauren Milici is a poet, writer, and pop culture connoisseur based in Metro Detroit. Teresa Douglas is a Mexican-American woman writing from Vancouver, B.C. torrin a. greathouse is a transgender cripple-punk, 2021 National Endowment for the Arts Fellow, and author of Wound from the Mouth of a Wound (Milkweed Editions, 2020). Welcome to Micro, a podcast for short but powerful writing. I’m your host, Drew Hawkins. Constellations, animal bones, and angry colonies. This episode includes microficti

Lacey Trautwein | Review of Final Girl by Lauren Milici | Glass: A Journal of Poetry

by Lauren Milici Big Lucks Books, 2019 Lauren Milici’s Final Girl (Big Lucks Books, 2019) survive, survive, survive. Here, her words are absolute: scars & hearts & [body]. Milici warns readers in the first few lines of Purge, “When the sun goes down, look for/his car across the street/Shut the blinds” a cautious notion to women everywhere to the last lines of His Girl Friday, “I must taste of ash, or expired film/of knees skinned/on the sidewalk”. Milici’s collection is about the arduous journey

Strength, Perseverance, and Resilience: A review of “Final Girl” by Lauren Milici

I’m watching Scream for the 20th time in my life or something close to that. I always listen to something or watch something in the background while writing because my mind can’t seem to focus unless I have something to combat in the background. But this time it’s for a different reason. That amazing meta, self-aware movie calls on some of the most predictable tropes and clichés in horror. My favorite, and the reason why I’m watching it while writing this particular review, is the trope of the “

INTERVIEW: LAUREN MILICI by Stephen Furlong

• None First things first, thank you for taking the time to talk to me. I’m grateful for it. To begin, I was wondering if you could talk a bit about your writing space. Do you have a specific location for writing and reading? Thank YOU for talking to me! Since I started my post-grad job, I’ve been doing a lot of reading and writing at my desk when I’m on my lunch break. In my new apartment, I sort of built a little creative space in the living room with a velvet floor cushion and some candles

BOOK REVIEW: Final Girl by Lauren Milici

I’ve started, erased, and restarted this review on several occasions. I’m sure there was some insight in some ideas I had, but I consistently saw what I had written, and was left frustrated. So I stopped writing for a bit, but here I am in this early new year, charging forth because it’s time to start and finish this review. I need to stop worrying about the perfect words. I need to trust my process. You may be thinking Can’t this guy just get on with it? But I think there’s a valuable lesson

#TPQ5: KOLLEEN CARNEY HOEPFNER

Lauren’s writing has always struck me as very honest and raw, and I am completely in love with everything she writes. Her vulnerability mixes with pop culture imagery in a brilliant way. The People’s Elbow is the best book I’ve read, probably in the last decade. Rax is my favorite writer at the moment. Maybe you have to have experienced Joey irl to understand how their work just sort of digs itself into your marrow, but you could also buy this book and still have a good idea of just how import

Staff Picks: The Best Books of 2019 - Part III

Another year has come and gone. You know what that means, don't you? Time for a bunch of strangers to tell you what was good! And why should you care what the LitReactor staff thinks are the best books of the year? Trick question! You shouldn't. But what they have to say might interest you nonetheless, because they are good-looking and knowledgeable and they read like the wind. So for those who care, we submit for your approval/derision some of LitReactor's favorite reads of 2019 (part 3). Check

Slasher films and Final Girls: How a sexual assault survivor found solace in an unlikely place –

To survive sexual assault is to enter into unknown terrain: the ground beneath, once familiar and firm, becomes shaken and uncertain. Like many survivors, Lauren Milici felt isolated, disconnected, and deeply alone after her attack. At 15, when other teenagers were exploring their identities and relishing in their youth, Milici was grappling with PTSD. As she says in her essay “Saved by the Final Girl” on BirthMoviesDeath.com, “There wasn’t anyone in my personal life that I could connect or rela